Category: Teaching Media

Ric Gibbs / Instructor UCLA Extension / Entertainment Studies Program

It is a long held maxim at film and television programs that the only way to teach television is to teach screenwriting. This makes a good deal of sense, since the producers of a series are (for the most part) the writers of that series. So why not start with the basic skill required for success? This was the case at Northwestern University when I earned my MFA, and remains the thinking today, decades later, at almost every major university, including UCLA.

But this thinking is flawed. Or, at the very least, it is an incomplete answer for the demands of a medium that is growing in sophistication and volume with each passing week.

It is no great observation to point out that scripted television is the fastest growing segment of the media universe. Despite proclamations that we have reached ‘peak television,’ scripted shows continue to grow in number each year and ORIGINAL SERIES (i.e., series that remain exclusive) have become the lynchpins of every major streaming service. Just consider the outsized impact that a single ‘must see’ series like THE HANDMAID’S TALE has on subscriber sales. It’s huge. A single hit series like GAME OF THRONES can drive subscriptions for months around its newest season.

In short, the engines of growth have changed across the tv landscape. And they will continue to change, offering – by far – the best employment opportunities for graduates of our various programs. And yet, with these opportunities come fresh challenges for those of us who teach: to keep pace, to evolve our disciplines, to make sure we are current in our understanding of industry trends and requirements. (more…)